Please login or register.

Login with email, password and session length
 

News:

Happy 15th Birthday, Freedom Force!


Author Topic: The Metal Thread  (Read 2342 times)

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
The Metal Thread
« on: September 29, 2011, 05:01:26 PM »
Formerly the "Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?" thread, henceforth known as "The Metal Thread"

I first became somewhat worried when I started to resemble GBT, who would not seem out of place amongst some of the gentlemen on the Mastodon roster (notably, Brent Hinds and Troy Sanders, pictured below):

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I've been listening to the latest album, The Hunter, ever since it was released on Tuesday.  Actually, to be precise, I've been listening to The Hunter and comparing/contrasting it, in my mind, with the much lauded, previous studio album, 2009's Crack the Skye.  Mastodon has publicly stated that The Hunter would prove to be a departure from the style of Crack the Skye (drummer Brann Daillor has likened the new album to Leviathan from 2004), which made progressive rock/metal enthusiasts salivate and, oh, I'm terribly sorry...excuse me for one second. *wipes mouth*

Ahem, I was about to note that I'm not entirely convinced that the departure that The Hunter makes from Crack the Skye totally unmoored the Mastodon vessel from its previous anchorage.  In truth, I think it does more to further any manner of mainstream success aspirations that the band might have to state publicly that the new album differs significantly from the previous album; however, I think that, if one listens closely enough (though, not too closely, lest one invite serious hearing loss), one can detect many of the trademark sludge-psychedelic, progressive tendencies characteristic of both Crack the Skye and its predecessor, the equally excellent Blood Mountain (2006). (None of this means to suggest that there is anything wrong with either Leviathan or The Hunter, both of which I admire.)

To be brief, I think 'tis clear that singles like "Curl of the Burl" (clocking in at a nice, neat, palatable 3:40) gesture toward hopes of appealing to an even broader audience.  One can also trace elements of the music in other tracks--e.g., "Octopus Has No Friends" (IIRC), with its uplifting vocal chord progressions that remind one of a Foo Fighters number--that manifest characteristics appealing to that oxymoronic "mainstream alternative" audience.  However, it would be incorrect to assert that The Hunter, as a whole, marks a conscious attempt to repackage the Mastodon sound into a more widely accessible, commercially successful product.  Later tracks on the album--perhaps the entire second half of it--are intricately layered with atmospheric keyboard sounds (organs, synths, even samplers) to an extent not even attempted on Crack the Skye (which features what I assume is a synth flute solo, hitherto unheard of in the Mastodon discography, in the outro to "Quintessence"/intro to "The Czar").  Some of these later tracks feature extended, bluesy (though highly distorted) soloing and other psychedelic indulgences (e.g., "Creature Lives," perhaps the kookiest Mastodon track ever, opens with a series of vocal and SFX samples and synth modulations).

In short, if you liked Crack the Skye, IMHO, you will probably like The Hunter for similar reasons.  To use a Yes analogy (because who could resist using a Yes analogy in casual conversation?), Crack the Skye is to Close to the Edge as  The Hunter is to Going for the One.*  Does anyone else have any thoughts on the new album?

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker


* In other words, the change between albums seems to involve the marked shortening of song lengths whilst maintaining the same level of song craftsmanship AND exploration of new possibilities to add to the band's repertoire.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 01:20:27 AM by ow_tiobe_sb »
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2011, 12:25:07 AM »
Mastodon is right in my wheelhouse, but for some reason I can't get into them.  How would you compare these last two albums to the newest album by the Sword, who are moving a little more "proggy" themselves?

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2011, 05:53:03 AM »
I will preface myself by admitting that I have only a glancing familiarity with The Sword.  With that said, I will offer that The Sword seems to owe its entire existence to Black Sabbath (whereas Mastodon evokes equal parts hardcore punk, King Crimson, AND Black Sabbath).  Given that The Sword is writing music in the 21st century and not the 1970s (but, all the while, writing music which references the heavy metal of the 1970s), music marketers seem to want to call The Sword's music "stoner metal," whereas Black Sabbath was simply producing seminal heavy metal (which would become the template for much "stoner metal").  Certainly, there is a strong similarity in choice of guitar tones between Black Sabbath, stoner metal like The Sword, and Mastodon's eclectic brand of "sludge metal" (I prefer to think of Mastodon as highly technical progressive metal), featuring heavy detuning and distortion.  However, that may be where the similarities between The Sword (and Black Sabbath) and Mastodon end.  Whereas (the limited amount of music that I have heard by) The Sword seems to rely on relatively straightforward, unswerving "four on the floor" 4/4 time (played at various tempos), Mastodon rarely adheres to any one time signature for an entire song, sometimes stopping on a dime (and leaving change), turning into, e.g., 5/4 time, then 5/8, then back to 4/4, etc. (To be fair, I have noticed that The Sword will periodically use both 4/4 and 3/4 time signatures in the course of a single track, but the transitions between time signatures are never quite so rapid nor as frequent as those found in Mastodon's music).  Mastodon also makes use of a greater range of vocal styles, from clean melodic and harmonised singing to raucous shouts/screams, whereas John Cronise seems content with one vocal style that is at least remotely inspired by Ozzy's (though, perhaps, with less whine).  Mastodon also seems more willing to experiment with instrumentation seldom heard on typical metal albums (e.g., the banjo on "Divinations" from Crack the Skye) than The Sword.

I should correct myself by adding one other point of convergence between the sounds of these two bands by noting their willingness to experiment with psychedelic/atmospheric touches (e.g., the intro to "Astraea's Dream" from The Sword's Warp Riders).  Nevertheless, to my ear, albums like Crack the Skye (or, for that matter, The Hunter) and Warp Riders sound very different.  I would explain myself better, but 'tis growing quite late and I must bid this thread adieu for the night.

SOMETIME LATER: I, personally, would come to these two bands and their respective albums looking for distinctly different listening experiences that make use of some similar timbres and orientations.  One could seek the following (which is in no way an exhaustive list of qualities) in both acts: doom (a.k.a., the Black Sabbath legacy), referential classic rock riffage and bombast, sci-fi/fantasy and horror themes, massive amounts of hair.  However, if I want to listen to an album that is largely down-tempo and earnestly wallowing in the distortion and heaviness of its own sound, I'd reach for an album by The Sword (or Madder Mortem, a very talented progressive doom metal band from Norway).  If, on the other hand, I want to listen to an album which varies rapidly between up-tempo and down-tempo passages (drawing on both punk and Black Sabbath-stamped metal influences), offers a bit of time signature variety, incorporates psychedelic guitar effects and atmospheres, etc., then I will reach for Mastodon.

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
« Last Edit: September 30, 2011, 02:34:52 PM by ow_tiobe_sb »
Two words: Moog.

Offline freegentile

  • Sr. Member
  • Posts: 305
  • Isaiah 53:1-12
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2011, 03:47:34 AM »
Would you believe there was a "Mastedon" back in the late 80's & 90's, a Christian rock band led by John Elefante, who was the lead vocals for Kansas?  :)   

Ye ole elephant theme catcheth on, I reckon.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2011, 06:14:45 PM »
I like Opeth for some of the reasons you like Mastadon.  Its weird that I can get into Mastadon.  I'll give Blood Mountain another few tries. 

Offline lugaru

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 4395
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2011, 06:29:05 PM »
I dont consider myself a mastodon fan but I do really enjoy them. I would say the threshold for too much Mastodon is pretty high.


Offline The Phantom Eyebrow

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 6145
  • Spectral of Aspect, Hairy of Brow
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2011, 06:08:46 PM »
I don't have any of their stuff yet, but I did chance to catch them live at a music festival over the summer months and they fairly tore the place up I have to admit.  I mean, they're no Uriah Heep now, but I was quite impressed.  :P

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2011, 07:05:00 PM »
Would you believe there was a "Mastedon" back in the late 80's & 90's, a Christian rock band led by John Elefante, who was the lead vocals for Kansas?  :)   

I teach undergraduates: I'm prepared to believe anything.

I like Opeth for some of the reasons you like Mastadon.  Its weird that I can get into Mastadon.  I'll give Blood Mountain another few tries.

I wonder if it's the punk influence that marks the difference.  If you like Opeth and want to know if there's anything of value to Mastodon, why not listen to Crack the Skye, which, arguably, has even more in common with your typical Opeth album than Blood Mountain (e.g., it is markedly more melodic and less angular than previous Mastodon albums)? 

I dont consider myself a mastodon fan but I do really enjoy them.

C'mon in the deep end, lou.  The water's fine...  :o

I mean, they're no Uriah Heep now, but I was quite impressed.  :P

Aye, but Mastodon has the same bombast in spades and has made its fair share of literary and historical allusions.

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2011, 12:51:57 AM »
Woot!  I just secured tickets to see Mastodon at the House of Blues (Boston) on November 21!  :thumbup: :kommandorox :gauntlet: :jeyrox :penguinspin

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline lugaru

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 4395
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2011, 01:32:43 PM »
Woot!  I just secured tickets to see Mastodon at the House of Blues (Boston) on November 21!  :thumbup: :kommandorox :gauntlet: :jeyrox :penguinspin

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker

No $%#^, I might have to get in on that. When I say I'm not a "fan" I mean I love the band, but if you play 10 seconds of any song, odds are low I'll guess it (unlike Dark Tranquility for example that I can guess any song in seconds).

btw ow_tiobe_sb, I thought about you when I read this article... a New Yorker article on Black Metal. I'm not sure if you are the black metal type (I still listen to a lot of black metal bands) but hearing descriptions of black metal in "New Yorker" boilerplate is really cool and weird.

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/musical/2011/10/10/111010crmu_music_frerejones

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2011, 03:13:20 PM »
I'm not sure if you are the black metal type (I still listen to a lot of black metal bands) but hearing descriptions of black metal in "New Yorker" boilerplate is really cool and weird.

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/musical/2011/10/10/111010crmu_music_frerejones

You certainly weren't kidding: "The most accelerated version of the black-metal beat—in which cymbals and multiple drums are hit with the rapid and even force of a sewing machine, which almost erases the idea of drumming as time-keeping—is called the 'blast beat'[...]."  A sewing machine?  Really?  I would have reached for "machine gun fire" first, for 'tis called "blast beat," after all, not "stitch beat."  :rolleyes:

Nah.  Most black metal doesn't appeal to me.  I briefly flirted with some recordings by a now defunct progressive black metal (or is it "blackened doom metal?"--these genres really become unhelpful as categorical tools at times) band from Brazil, Avec Tristesse, because I admired the music enough (and still do) to try to ignore the distracting screams often coming from the vocalist.  It didn't work out.  Growling, I've found, can be performed in a nuanced, expressive fashion in the right hands, er, vocal cords (viz. Mikael Åkerfeldt--who has a terrific range of growls--or Vurtox (a.k.a., Andy Schmidt of the terrific German extreme progressive metal band Disillusion)).  Screaming, on the other hand, IMHO, appears to be flatter in its range of possible deliveries and just leaves me cold and repulsed.  I understand the argument that asserts growling/screaming is used to signify extreme intensity; however, my understanding of intensity, insofar as it applies to vocals, is that its signification needs to fit within a vocal continuum, from strictly clean to the dirtiest, most guttural extreme vocalisations.  Screaming seems to exist within a sphere of its own, using a different vocal function (perhaps something akin to an animal call, which is the category some scientists might put the human scream into) that gives it presence but seems to sacrifice variety of tone qualities.  Intensity can also be achieved just as easily through clean vocals, IMHO, but I know that some opt for growling/screaming because they deem it necessary to signify the hallmarks of certain extreme metal genres.

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2011, 06:53:01 PM »
I like some of the proto-black metal groups like Celtic Frost and Venom.  I kind of like Venom because I'm pretty sure everything they do is done tongue-in-cheek, but they won't admit it.  I want to buy into the fantasy while I'm listening to the music, but it stops there.  Some of those groups are a little too freaky for my taste.

Offline lugaru

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 4395
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2011, 02:41:16 PM »
Yeah, when it comes to the "dark and demonic" in music it either has to be REALLY cheesy or completely absent. I'm a big lyrics guy which means that there is a lot of metal that does not appeal to me because of the braindead passages, while a lot of stuff that should not appeal to a metal head (like The Postal Service and The Cure). Examples if just wonderfully cheese black metal is Old Mans Child... mostly about allowing yourself to be possessed by demons so you can win on the battlefield in grand lord of the rings sounding settings. Kind of awesome, really. Likewise some old Cradle of Filth is just funny and dark and gruesome, it reads more like extreme little horror vignetes. If they take this stuff seriosly I kind of feel bad for them but as entertainment it is pure gold.

Great metal lyricists for me include Michael Stane from Dark Tranquility, who writes more about melancholy and disatisfaction. Also I go back and forth with my love for extreme vocals... there are bands where Operatic or soaring vocals can seem inauthentic and at other times they are awesome. For me the best thing is bands with multiple vocalists or vocal styles.

And on the subject of extreme vocals... I've got a major crush on this girl right now:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=De26XtRUCg4

(let me know what you think).

Offline lugaru

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 4395
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2011, 03:06:58 PM »
Nah.  Most black metal doesn't appeal to me.  I briefly flirted with some recordings by a now defunct progressive black metal (or is it "blackened doom metal?"--these genres really become unhelpful as categorical tools at times) band from Brazil, Avec Tristesse, because I admired the music enough (and still do) to try to ignore the distracting screams often coming from the vocalist. 
ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker

Oh man, you made my day by referencing Avec Tristesse, I was very impressed with them. I agree that nuance is very rare in black metal, compared to the regular vocalists and even death metal vocalists. My favorite singers tend to be people who stradle multiple styles, from death to pretty far out there operatic, such as Devin Townsend.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXfnr0pxQQI&ob=av2n

That said I also love Pain of Salvation, which is soaring hard rock vocals, but damn, he really goes places with it. But very often I will listen to a prog band lay down some REALLY heavy tracks and have the  atmosphere ruined by an almost cherubic prescence (like some latter Dream Theater, the band got heavier and Labrie could not keep up). For me stuff like Death Magnetic by Metallica is nearly perfect... despite some recent bad albums Hettfield can really back up those proggy thrash beats on the new album. While it is still new new album, before the one with Lou Reed drops. 

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: Can One Listen to Too Much Mastodon?
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2011, 04:57:01 PM »
I thought you were going to link to an Arch Enemy video.  I have a heavy metal crush on that girl, but only like the KISS song they remade.  I'll have to check out Straight Line Stitch at home because I don't want audio here at work.  She is pretty hot.

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2011, 01:52:12 AM »
In the interests of keeping the discussion going through limitless expansion, I have renamed the thread "The Metal Thread."  Having "Mastodon" in the thread title seemed to narrow, given the current conversation.  :D

As far as female voices are concerned, I tend to prefer two types: the typical, clean, operatic voice and what I like to call the Janis Joplinesque alternative (e.g., given to really belting out the lines, evocative of something raw and (seemingly) untutored).  I can give two examples: Julie Kiss of To-Mera and Olivia Berka of (the now defunct) Polaris (a Boston-area band), respectively.  While Ms. Brown is clearly very talented (and, obviously, is able to carry a tune, even when the back of her top seems to have disintegrated  :o), I'm not strongly disposed toward her vocal performance, as I prefer only occasional extreme female vocals to punctuate particular phrases, not entire verses.  :ph34r:

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2011, 02:15:55 AM »
SLS kicked butt.  I'm going to check out some of their CDs.

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2011, 05:35:15 AM »
This is a question that really intrigues me, and I would like to pose it here:

What 2-3 bands (or particular albums) are your go-to musical sources to put you in the optimal mood (whatever that might be for you) during the following scenarios?

1. The morning commute.
2. The slow evening at home.
3. Before "the big event," whether it be a football (American or otherwise) match or that presentation you need to give to your colleagues.
4. After a frustrating experience.
5. When you want to drown out the sound of Hanson playing over the supermarket audio system.

Just curious.  Here are my answers:

1A. Pagan's Mind (either Celestial Entrance or Enigmatic: Calling); Manticora (Hyperion) (great band, goofy video of a song not from the Hyperion album); and, of late, a toss-up between Protest the Hero (Kezia) and Canvas Solaris (Cortical Techtonics).

2A. Rishloo (Feathergun); Opeth (Morningrise); and Eniac Requiem (Space Eternal Void).

3A. Communic (Waves of Visual Decay); Scale the Summit (Monument); and Mastodon (Blood Mountain).

4A. Twisted into Form (Then Comes Affliction To Awaken The Dreamer); Disillusion (Back to Times of Splendor); and Evergrey (In Search of Truth).

5A. Opeth (Ghost Reveries); Nevermore (Dead Heart in a Dead World); and 'Neath (The Spiders Sleep).

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2011, 12:42:52 PM »
Wow.  I've heard of maybe two of those groups.  I'll have to look for some of them on Youtube. 

I'm going to include Led Zepplin and Rush as "metal bands."

1. Normally I listen to sports radio, but I'd probably listen to one of the first couple of Judas Priest albums because they are sort of mellow and trippy.  Not too distracting.
2. Rush's Caress of Steel.  One of my all-time favorite albums.
3. I'm all over the place on this one.  Maybe Pantera, specifically the song Cowboys from Hell, but another contender is Anthrax's song Cadillac Rock Box.  Maybe the Grand Conjuration by Opeth or Crazy Train by Ozzy.  I love those songs and they get me pumped up.  In college I used to listen to Pink Floyd before playing football, so in a way it really depneds on if I'm passively watching or actively taking part in the big event.
4. This is where the mighy Zep comes in.  I can pop in any album and get transported to a much better mental place.  Usually this is Middle Earth (not the movie version).
5. Although they are not my favroite band, I think I'd opt for Ride the Lightning by Metallica.  Solid album all the way through.

As I thought about my answers I realized that I normally only listen to metal when category 2 applies. 

I'm pretty mainstream as far as music goes.

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2011, 02:48:50 PM »
[Randomness]
May I present, Lugaru, if he had a death/black metal band logo:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Xenolith, reimagined as a pagan metal band logo:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

[/Randomness]

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline lugaru

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 4395
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #20 on: October 14, 2011, 03:06:22 PM »
This is a question that really intrigues me, and I would like to pose it here:

What 2-3 bands (or particular albums) are your go-to musical sources to put you in the optimal mood (whatever that might be for you) during the following scenarios?

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker

Mm... I feel like I derrailed the hell out of this thread but that said, I do love talking metal with the few fans on this forum.

1. The morning commute.
Stuff I've listened to "to death" so I need not pay attention to enjoy it. Iron Maiden, Metallica, Dream Theater.

2. The slow evening at home.
AKA cooking, doing chores, reading, computer time. Pelican plays a type of "elevator metal" without lyrics that is slow and doomy but with lots of skilled playing and changes of theme. I put "Pelican" into pandora and get a lot of great bands with no singers.
Also: Aghora/Cynic for cool trippy metal that is relaxing and Theater of Tragedy for slow, doomy, operatic background music.

3. Before "the big event," whether it be a football (American or otherwise) match or that presentation you need to give to your colleagues.
I'm gonna call this either my "I'm going nowhere on a piece of gym equipment" or my "I'm falling asleep at work and need to wake up" music.
Nevermore - Dreaming in Neon Black super heavy album but nuanced and who cares how nihilistic the lyrics are, they are a trip.
Old Mans Child Absolutely ROARING black metal, big, dumb and cheesy, tons of fun.
Arch Enemy All those lyrics about revolutions got me spinning the wheels on my stationary bicycle. Great, high energy stuff with really "pretty" guitar solos.

4. After a frustrating experience.
Comfort food metal, or else some big dumb "I am Angry" american stuff depending on my mood.
Dark Tranquility because I know most songs by heart.
Devin Townsend he alternates between big dumb angry self parody and extremely cerebral auto biographical metaphor... he has an album for every mood.
Pantera They distill and bottle "I want to punch some dude".

5. When you want to drown out the sound of Hanson playing over the supermarket audio system.
Emperor You are playing Black Eyed Peas? WELL I AM THE BLACK WIZARDS!!!1!
Strapping Young Lad songs like $%!+STORM punch the wall harder than I could.
Mercenary very versatile band, all around good metal. Gives me something cool to listen to while I watch videos of pop stars shake their butts at my gym.

6. Just listen and geek out to it.
Maudlin of the Well A weird mix of folk, jazz and death metal.
Spiral Architect A proggy, fairly pretencious, inspired by a mixture of Ayn Rand (with songs like Fountainhead) and Black Sabbath. But mathy, in a good way.
King Diamond King Diamond albums are like cheezy audiobooks of 80's horror films. Listen to Abigail with the lyrics printed out.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 03:33:21 PM by lugaru »

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #21 on: October 14, 2011, 03:35:57 PM »
Those are pretty cool logos.  Xenolith looks great.  I love it. 

Hmm.  More bands I'll have to check out.  Thanks lugaru.

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #22 on: October 14, 2011, 03:57:48 PM »
Both Aghora and Cynic have received a good deal of rotation on my iPod.  Spiral Architect, I should add, is rather jazzy, to the point where, I believe, Øyvind Hægeland (the vocalist) does a heavy metal version of scat singing.  I really like the mix on A Sceptic's Universe, for it takes genuine pains to give the buoyant bass a constant presence (whereas the bass guitar often gets lost amid the other guitar tracks and the boom of the kick drum in the mixes of other metal bands).  If you like Spiral Architect, you might like Twisted into Form.

I have yet to find a way to appreciate Maudlin of the Well (or Kayo Dot, for that matter).  While I typically value the eclectic in music, I just find MotW annoyingly eclectic.

One cannot go wrong with Led Zeppelin, though, to my ear, they typically sound like an extended blues/hard rock outfit more often than they sound incredibly metallic (compared to, e.g., Black Sabbath).  They do a bit of everything: (hard) rock 'n' roll, folk, blues, symphonic rock, etc.  In a similar vein, to quote Fanboys, "Rush is variety."  :thumbup:

[More Randomness]
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
[/More Randomness]

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 04:13:56 PM by ow_tiobe_sb »
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2011, 05:50:41 PM »
It looks like Spiral Architect is on the top of my list.  I'm a fan of any kind of "proggy" music, so I'd probably like them.   I agree that Zep is more of a heavy blues band.

The Eyebrow rocks.  My favorite albums is "Sand in my Eyes."  :)
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 05:53:14 PM by Xenolith »

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #24 on: October 14, 2011, 06:20:55 PM »
Aye, Sand in My Eyes is a classic.  :jeyrox Who could forget tracks like "The Shortest Hair (Has Been Plucked for You)," "A Unibrow Divided," "Brows Without a Face," "Capillose Crest," and, my personal favourite, that groundbreaking hardcore-rap-metal-klezmer-fusion number, "Browz-n-the-Hood?"

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2011, 06:43:44 PM »
 :lol:

Brows without a Face... hahahahaha

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2011, 07:50:59 PM »
Someone should stop me.  Now.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline ow_tiobe_sb

  • A Trivial Avatar for Serious FR
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 3964
  • Look! A pony!
    • Melmoth Hall on Whimsy Lane
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2011, 06:11:54 PM »
FYI, I recently came across a rather talented group, East of the Wall.  They produce a very artful variety of progressive sludge/post-metal that I find difficult to take out of rotation.  I am now hooked on their latest album, The Apologist (released earlier this week), which is absolutely superb.  It mixes abrasive, highly technical metal passages with richly layered, contemplative, atmospheric sections, sometimes incorporating a series of tracks into an interrelated suite with a tremendously progressive sensibility.  You can audition tracks from their previous studio album, Ressentiment on mflow.

ow_tiobe_sb
Phantom Bunburyist and Whirled Braker
Two words: Moog.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2011, 07:34:30 PM »
Thanks for the heads up.  I haven't had time to check out all of these groups yet, but I will. 

I've been in a heavy Black Sabbath and Led Zepplin mode for the last few weeks.  I just realized I don't have Volume Four.  D'oh!  From the first Black Sabbath album to Sabotage, the crew really takes off in some weird directions.  I'm curious about the last few albums with Ozzy.  I've never heard them, and I know they've recieved bad reviews, but I'm curious.  I like Coda, Kiss Unmasked and Dynasty, so atypical stuff is okay with me.

I've also been listening to the new Opeth CD which I'm going to say is not metal at all, but I like it.

Offline Xenolith

  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1969
Re: The Metal Thread
« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2011, 02:31:27 AM »
So tonight I found myself listening to songs by artists you both have presented in this thread.  None of it hit home with me, but I really appreciate learning about these groups.  Spiral Architect was inded my favorite, but I thought they were too frenetic.   I ended up listening to Utopia "Communion with the Sun" to sooth my jangled nerves.  Strapping Young Lad was anything but, by the looks of 'em.  :0